The Phases of Competition

The journey to the crown encompasses several different phases of competition. Each phase has a separate weighted percentage of the overall score. All phases of competition, weighted percentages, mechanics of scoring, and other procedures are specified by the Miss America Organization and Miss America’s Outstanding Organization.

Private Interview

The judges are looking for the contestant who exudes the various qualities and attributes of a Miss America titleholder. Judges score based on their overall first impression, personality, appearance, intelligence, validated opinions, speech, vocabulary, grammar, responses in context, style, and emotional control.

Lifestyle and Fitness for Teens 

This phase of competition looks for the contestant who understands the importance of physical fitness in her everyday life. Judging is based on the overall first impression, physical fitness and health, overall physique, personality, and execution of a fun fitness routine.

On Stage Interview for Miss

Miss candidates answer one on-stage interview question designed to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to serve as a compelling spokeswoman. This phase of competition is an extension of the private interview held earlier in the day and judging is based on her sense of confidence, personality, stage presence, richness of voice, expression, vocabulary, and sincerity.

Talent

Usually, the audience’s favorite phase of competition, contestants perform a 90-second talent routine to demonstrate their unique abilities! Talents can include singing, dancing, playing musical instruments, spoken word, roller skating, and anything in-between. Judging is based on overall entertainment value, personality, interpretive ability, technical skill, execution, technique, stage presence, and the totality of all elements – including props, voice, use of body, and choreography.

Evening Wear and Social  Impact Initiative Statement  or On Stage Question

Contestants demonstrate their personal sense of style, grace, and elegance in this phase of competition. Judging is based on the overall first impression, sense of confidence, personality, stage presence, and technique – including walk, posture, appropriateness of attire, and sense of attractiveness.

Teen contestants also answer one on-stage question during evening wear, allowing the judges to evaluate the contestant’s ability to think on her feet and speak to a large audience.

Teen contestants also answer one on-stage question during evening wear, allowing the judges to evaluate the contestant’s ability to think on her feet and speak to a large audience.

Miss contestants give a social impact initiative statement during evening wear, allowing the judges to evaluate her ability to speak passionately and convincingly to a large audience about an issue that she feels passionately about.


The Judging Panel

Our 2019 Judges following the Private Interview Portion of the Competition

The judging panel is comprised of 5-7 individuals from a variety of backgrounds with myriad areas of expertise. Some judges have extensive pageant experience, while others are novices. Each year, a new panel undergoes training with the Board of Directors prior to the competition beginning. During this training, judges learn about the phases of competition and what to look for, the qualities and attributes of the ideal titleholder, the job responsibilities of the titleholders, and the mechanics of scoring. Judges are specifically instructed not to communicate with each other about scores or contestants during or between any portion of the competition. Judges also are instructed not to compare any contestants, but to score each contestant individually.


The Mechanics of Scoring

Each phase of competition has a certain weighted percentage of the overall score for the contestant. Scores range from 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest. Judges hand write scores for each phase of competition and those are immediately collected and tabulated by two auditors. The highest and lowest score for each phase of competition is dropped from the calculation. The highest score from each contestant group is awarded the title, with the two highest scores from the teen groups receiving the two titles awarded.


Awarding of Titles for Team Seattle

Teens: All teens are in one competition group. The highest two scores receive the titles of Miss Seattle’s Outstanding Teen and Miss Emerald City’s Outstanding Teen. Assignment of titles is unrelated to scores, but instead based upon geographic location of the titleholder to Seattle as well as geographic location to the corresponding miss winners. All runners-up for teens are from the group. The number of runners-up announced varies from year to year depending on the number of teen contestants.

Miss: Because of different residency requirements, Miss Seattle candidates and Miss Emerald City candidates are in two separate groups that are established before the competition begins. The highest score from the Miss Seattle group is crowned Miss Seattle with runners-up awarded from that group, and the highest score from the Miss Emerald City group is crowned Miss Emerald City and runners-up awards from that group. The number of runners-up announced varies from year to year depending on the number of contestants in the group. The number of runners-up announced varies from year to year depending on the number of contestants in the group.


Awards Presented

Our goal is to award the largest amount of scholarships possible and distribute that award to as many contestants as possible. Because of this, we are unable to announce award amounts until just before the pageant because our budget is constantly fluctuating. On average, we award approximately $5,000 in educational scholarships with another $5,000 worth of prizes, services, and in-kind gifts. The following awards are announced each year:

Outstanding Teen Awards

  • Miss Seattle’s Outstanding Teen
  • Miss Emerald City’s Outstanding Teen
  • Teen Runners-Up
  • Overall Highest Private Interview
  • Overall Highest Fitness
  • Overall Highest Talent
  • Overall Highest Evening Wear/On-Stage Question
  • Teen Director’s Award
  • Teen People’s Choice Award
  • Teen Quality of Life Award

Miss Seattle Group Awards

  • Miss Seattle
  • Miss Seattle Runners-Up
  • Overall Highest Private Interview
  • Overall Highest On-Stage Interview
  • Overall Highest Talent
  • Overall Highest Evening Wear/Social Impact Initiative Statement

Miss Emerald City Group Awards

  • Miss Emerald City
  • Miss Emerald City Runners-Up
  • Overall Highest Private Interview
  • Overall Highest On-Stage Interview
  • Overall Highest Talent
  • Overall Highest Evening Wear/Social Impact Initiative Statement

Combined Miss Awards
Seattle and Emerald City Groups Combined

  • Four Points of the Crown Award
  • Miss Director’s Award
  • Miss People’s Choice Award
  • Miss Quality of Life Award

Additional Awards
Teen and Miss Contestants Combined

  • Miss Congeniality
  • CMN Miracle Maker Award
  • Highest Program Book Advertisement Sales Award
  • Highest Ticket Sales Award
  • Joell Posey Grager Overcoming Adversity Award